Edith Leoso

Citizens Successfully Challenge Mining Laws

February 21, 2014 by Rebecca Kemble

On February 16, 2014 two groups set out from opposite directions on Highway 77 to demonstrate their opposition to a law written by and passed for GTac that prohibits public access to managed forest land around mining activity sites. Nearly 100 people marched to the Moore Park Siding for a press conference, and several dozen breached the “Forbidden Zone” to enjoy the gorgeous, sparkling winter day in the Penokee Hills.

There were no arrests and no visible presence of law enforcement officials.

Due to bridge restrictions in Mellen, GTac is being forced to use a longer route through the Bad River Reservation.

GTac Bulk Sample Trucks Routed Through Bad River Reservation

GTac truck hauling bulk sample rock out of Moore Park Road. Photo: Pete Rasmussen

GTac truck hauling bulk sample rock out of Moore Park Road. Photo: Pete Rasmussen

Due to bridge restrictions in the town of Mellen, Gogebic Taconite (GTac) is routing their trucks carrying bulk sample rock through the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Reservation.

The route of the trucks hauling the samples is from Moore Park Road, east into Hurley on Highway 77, north on 51 and then to Highway 2, back west across the Bad River Reservation, and through Ashland on their way to Minnesota. The loads can’t travel through the shorter, more cost-effective route through Mellen because of a bridge restriction in the center of town.

Controversy continues to follow GTac, as asbestiform minerals have been found and confirmed at several bulk sample sites by Dr. Tom Fitz, geologist from Northland College. Asbestiform particles are responsible for mesothelioma, an incurable lung disease common around iron ore mines. GTac loads stand to spread the airborne particles along the route.

Due to bridge restrictions in Mellen, GTac is being forced to use a longer route through the Bad River Reservation.

Due to bridge restrictions in Mellen, GTac is being forced to use a longer route through the Bad River Reservation.

In an interview last October with WPR, Bad River Chair Mike Wiggins Jr. accused GTac of covering up the presence of the dangerous mineral. “A cover-up of asbestos [that] geologists and children could walk in there and see with the naked eye,” he said. “[It] is such a compelling, premeditation for disaster, a disaster that would befall the Bad River Reservation and non-tribal people of the Bad River Watershed. It’s a deal breaker. Explode an asbestos rock that Tom Fitz has found with the highest level of asbestos he’s ever seen in some of those rocks and tell me how that’s creating the circle of life. I’ll say this: It’s recreating the circle of life by causing death.”

Wiggins noted that Bad River wardens briefly detained one of the nine trucks that passed through the reservation yesterday.

Meanwhile, about 100 concerned citizens gathered Sunday at the entrance to one of the bulk sample sites to demonstrate support of clean air, clean water and the new mining laws. At least 20 people crossed over into the “forbidden zone” that the latest in GTac-bought legislation created around the bulk sample sites to prevent the public from observing their activities.

moorepark

Citizens to Challenge Mining Laws

Press Release February 12, 2014
For More Information Contact:
Barbara With – 715- 209 5471
Paul DeMain – 715-558-2991


Wisconsin Citizens Target Illegal Mine Company Pandering

Moore Park Siding, Wisconsin - Wisconsin citizens working to protect the pristine environment of the Penokee Range in Northern Wisconsin from morally illegitimate mining exploration and socially unacceptable environment degradation will gather on Sunday, February 16 from 1-3 PM to help bring public awareness to the proposed destruction of  Wisconsin’s natural resources. 

2 PM Press conference on Moore Park Siding, approximately 5 miles east of Mellen on Highway 77, will feature citizens who will enter the area deemed “closed to the public” by Gogebic Taconite (GTac) officials. 

Citizens from Northern Wisconsin, Iron and Ashland Counties, the Chippewa Federation and those with historic ties to the ceded territory in the Bad River Watershed, and others impacted by downstream degradation from the huge open pit operation have declared their intent to violate the alleged closing of Public Managed Forest Lands (MFL) under a special law introduced by pro-mining Senator Tom Tiffany (R-Hazelhurst). Tiffany said it was the intent of the original pro-mining, streamlined permitting process bill, known as SB-1, and written by Gogebic Taconite attorneys, to “allow degradation of the environment.” 

Dubbed the “Hunt to Save the Golden Goose” now laying pristine golden eggs of clean water, forests, lakes, trout streams, asbestos-free air and unlimited prosperity in a growing tourist-based economy, this action will include citizens who have worked tirelessly to prevent a mine, once highlighted to be one of the world’s largest open pit mines by Gogebic Taconite, from destroying the livelihood of regional farmers, tourist-based businesses and resource harvesters. The mining project is headed by GTac Manager Bill Williams, currently under investigation for committing environmental crimes in Spain.

While pro-mining legislation prevailed in the GOP-dominated atmosphere of Tea Party politics and millions of dollars in lobbying contributions during the 2010-2012 election cycle, a wide majority of citizens in Northern Wisconsin oppose the project funded by the 18th richest billionaire in the world, Chris Kline of Florida.  

Senator Tiffany introduced further legislation to prevent citizens from monitoring mining exploration and charting sedimentation of trout streams and wetlands, reported by the public and confirmed by the Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources during drilling in the summer of 2013. The closure also allegedly prevents Chippewa Treaty citizens from observing and harvesting reserved resources.

 

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moorepark

Penokee Hills Education Summit Keynote Speaker Josephine Mandamin

The Penokee Hills Education Summit will take place Friday and Saturday, September 20 – 21, 2013 at the Whitecap Resort in Upson, WI. One of the keynote speakers for the Friday Water Awards Dinner will be Josephine Mandamin, Anishinaabekwe from Manitoulin Island who made a sacred walk around each of the Great Lakes over a period of give years, and then traveled from Kingston, Ontario to the Atlantic Ocean along the St. Lawrence River.

Cost for the full 2-day event is $49. Register for the Summit here.

Josephine Mandamin

Josephine Mandamin